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Mar 8, 2022
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Some people on reddit are up in arms about ticket prices being too low.... which I think is ridiculous and kind of classism. A few people though have mentioned that through the day there was a lot of line jumping and that type of thing which likely led to frustration. That really got me thinking on how much of these fights that we see happen now and then in parks are actually rooted by poor guest experience and frustration.
 
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Some people on reddit are up in arms about ticket prices being too low.... which I think is ridiculous and kind of classism. A few people though have mentioned that through the day there was a lot of line jumping and that type of thing which likely led to frustration. That really got me thinking on how much of these fights that we see happen now and then in parks are actually rooted by poor guest experience and frustration.
I think it’s something I’ve found from people who work at parks (higher up) that higher prices don’t get looked at as classism since raising rates means they can make the park safer from a hiring and implementing security measures. While I have an issue with people who get up in arms about low pricing, I do also take issue with calling it classism. Daily admission for Knott’s (for those that don’t know) are $69, and if there were any local discounts going on it’s even lower. Just because I was interested, SFMM is $84. Pacific Park (Santa Monica) is $40 for fall smaller area. Disneyland, interestingly, is $100 for residents (looks like $76 for out of state). Universal resident is $104. So I would say in this case that Knott’s low price does make it attractive as an option and I don’t feel it would be classism at all to say they should be $80.

At SFA people were abusing the system by getting passes then not fulfilling the payments (meaning they get to go for like $8). So in cases like this raising rates was purely about pushing a group of people out from the park by making them fulfill a commitment and pay it upfront.

At other parks they find that people were basically treating the park as a “day camp” by buying their underage (18 and under) kids a pass and having them used 3 sometimes 4 times a week. I’ve heard of some parks starting to think of putting limits on junior passes like 1 adult pass must be purchased with the first 2, then a 2nd adult pass for 3+ junior passes. So in this case it raises the cost by not being able to buy just the junior pass and setting them free.

Although I will say my personal perspective is it’s a little bit of everything. It’s a touch that too many people can afford to be at the park and it brings in people that would be looking to cause problems. It’s a touch of the lack of respect and line jumping that’s going on that gets people upset. Some of it is lack of control from park employees to not spot those people and kick them out of lines or out of the park in the first place. Lastly I imagine some of it is just the heat being high and crowds being big that added to the issue.
 
Mar 8, 2022
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I think it’s something I’ve found from people who work at parks (higher up) that higher prices don’t get looked at as classism since raising rates means they can make the park safer from a hiring and implementing security measures. While I have an issue with people who get up in arms about low pricing, I do also take issue with calling it classism. Daily admission for Knott’s (for those that don’t know) are $69, and if there were any local discounts going on it’s even lower. Just because I was interested, SFMM is $84. Pacific Park (Santa Monica) is $40 for fall smaller area. Disneyland, interestingly, is $100 for residents (looks like $76 for out of state). Universal resident is $104. So I would say in this case that Knott’s low price does make it attractive as an option and I don’t feel it would be classism at all to say they should be $80.
When used in the context of literally keeping people away I don't see how you can't call it classism..... The motivation is literally to keep "less desireables" out by raising the price to a point that they can't afford. To be clear, I'm not saying that raising prices is always classism -- it very rarely is IMHO..... but in this context, it's hard to argue that it's not.

At SFA people were abusing the system by getting passes then not fulfilling the payments (meaning they get to go for like $8). So in cases like this raising rates was purely about pushing a group of people out from the park by making them fulfill a commitment and pay it upfront.
This is a whole different thing..... and it's not even about raising rates, it's about changing the structure of things. I know it's not what you're saying but your statement could be interpreted as you saying that people who are poor are out to game the system and default. Closing loopholes isn't classism either....

At other parks they find that people were basically treating the park as a “day camp” by buying their underage (18 and under) kids a pass and having them used 3 sometimes 4 times a week. I’ve heard of some parks starting to think of putting limits on junior passes like 1 adult pass must be purchased with the first 2, then a 2nd adult pass for 3+ junior passes. So in this case it raises the cost by not being able to buy just the junior pass and setting them free.
Sure, that happens..... but yet that could be resolved by some different rules and requirements. Regardless, this isn't everyone that is of a lower income that is doing this..... It's not fair to punish those that are being honest and respectful because some people ruin things. Hell, if you really want to dive into this I could say that wealthy people who complain about stupid shit and delay lines and stuff could be just as annoying..... Not that I'm trying to make that argument but I'm just saying that it's not like there's a "perfect" class of people.

Although I will say my personal perspective is it’s a little bit of everything. It’s a touch that too many people can afford to be at the park and it brings in people that would be looking to cause problems.
I don't understand how this isn't classism..... too many people so we raise the price and punish those that make less money. That's really not a fair thing to do.
 
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Mar 8, 2022
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When used in the context of literally keeping people away I don't see how you can't call it classism..... The motivation is literally to keep "less desireables" out by raising the price to a point that they can't afford. To be clear, I'm not saying that raising prices is always classism -- it very rarely is IMHO..... but in this context, it's hard to argue that it's not.


This is a whole different thing..... and it's not even about raising rates, it's about changing the structure of things. I know it's not what you're saying but your statement could be interpreted as you saying that people who are poor are out to game the system and default. Closing loopholes isn't classism either....


Sure, that happens..... but yet that could be resolved by some different rules and requirements. Regardless, this isn't everyone that is of a lower income that is doing this..... It's not fair to punish those that are being honest and respectful because some people ruin things. Hell, if you really want to dive into this I could say that wealthy people who complain about stupid shit and delay lines and stuff could be just as annoying..... Not that I'm trying to make that argument but I'm just saying that it's not like there's a "perfect" class of people.


I don't understand how this isn't classism..... too many people so we raise the price and punish those that make less money. That's really not a fair thing to do.
I don't know if this post is what sparked the forum etiquette post but the more it weighs on my thoughts I feel like it is since the conversation just dropped and didn't continue. Unless I add some mindset I don't think I'm going to have a clear head for the rest of the day. In my reply I tried very hard to be calm and open ended without speaking in absolutes but the truth is the OP really did hit me in a way that I feel like many people in this entire community don't seem to grasp. It is absolutely hurtful to me that people look at the lower class as a problem. It seems like most people that gather in enthusiast forums have the means to go to parks whenever they want and get season passes to wherever they feel like. I grew up never knowing what a season pass felt like.... hell, I barely got to go to amusement parks when I was younger. It wasn't anyone's fault.... my dad was nearly killed in a motorcycle accident (only had 10% chance of living) when I was 5 years old. My family basically survived on my dad's disability and my mom's low paying job. My family could have chose to be bitter about the person who pulled out in front of my dad but we weren't.... I was raised to respect people and understand that accidents happen. Aside from maybe a trip to Kennywood or Geauga Lake once or twice a year there were a few times we had a "big" vacation to Cedar Point. My roller coasters in my younger days were me riding my bike around our yard which had some pretty steep hills and just pretending that that was the coaster. I never even dreamed that one day I would be able to visit the parks that I have and, truth be told, it's still not the easiest thing to just go to a park. I watch conversations like this play out about how the lower class are a problem and that prices should be raised to keep problems out but all I keep asking myself is what did my family do wrong? Why are we the people that needed to be kept away from the parks -- we never jumped in line, we followed all the rules, we were respectful to everyone..... can you even imagine how much of a joy it was for us to be able to be at that park?

I don't know.... maybe this is just the world we live in now where those that struggle are the problem. It might be easy for someone who hasn't had to face these issues to just dismiss it as the problem. Truth is, I guess sometimes I don't even see it the way that I should but it's when things like this that come up that I feel for that child that I was and all of the people who currently face that today. It really hits home.

I'm sorry if I offended in my reply but my sincere hope is that you try to put yourself in my position and at least try to understand where I'm coming from. Sometimes things just are out of reach for the lower class but that's a very different thing than intentionally making it that way.
 

EdK

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When used in the context of literally keeping people away I don't see how you can't call it classism..... The motivation is literally to keep "less desireables" out by raising the price to a point that they can't afford. To be clear, I'm not saying that raising prices is always classism -- it very rarely is IMHO..... but in this context, it's hard to argue that it's not.
I don't see it as classism at all - it's basic capitalism. If the ticket prices are too low than the park becomes overcrowded and problems occur. By raising the prices either people can't afford it or it's not worth the cost to them. And it doesn't mean that a teenager from a family that wouldn't necessarily be able to afford an increase in ticket prices is behind the violence. We're seeing all kinds of violence across the economic spectrum in high schools. You could argue it's the rich kids with their sense of entitlement that think they can get away with anything that are the ones cutting lines and starting fights.

In this case the rich kids win, but the rich always win.

If the park can raise prices, lower the crowd count thus providing a safer environment and still make the same amount of money or even more while providing a better park experience for their customers, they should do it.
 
Mar 8, 2022
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I don't see it as classism at all - it's basic capitalism. If the ticket prices are too low than the park becomes overcrowded and problems occur. By raising the prices either people can't afford it or it's not worth the cost to them. And it doesn't mean that a teenager from a family that wouldn't necessarily be able to afford an increase in ticket prices is behind the violence. We're seeing all kinds of violence across the economic spectrum in high schools. You could argue it's the rich kids with their sense of entitlement that think they can get away with anything that are the ones cutting lines and starting fights.

In this case the rich kids win, but the rich always win.

If the park can raise prices, lower the crowd count thus providing a safer environment and still make the same amount of money or even more while providing a better park experience for their customers, they should do it.
As I said, in almost all cases that prices are increased it's not classism but when you are specifically doing it to keep "unruly" people out then you are literally saying that the lower class guests are the ones causing all the problems (this is different than raising costs to keep the quantity of people down which is supply in demand).
 
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