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Aug 14, 2010
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Well, she appears to be a guest of size which would explain the restraint not fully clicking in. I have had times myself where I felt like I was close to flying out of my seat ( on SFA and KD owned woodies).
 
Sep 10, 2012
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Do we know if that is the picture being painted here? Is that what social media types are talking about?

Found another picture on Twitter:

 

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Mar 30, 2010
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All I've seen on social media and other news is that it's possible her restraint wasn't all the way down and/or her body shape allowed her to slip out (restraint on stomach rather than legs/hips).
 
Jul 22, 2010
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From Lee @ WDWm

Pretty good working theory if you ask me.

First, I would toss out everything that this Carmen Brown person is saying.


None of that is accurate.
1. The restraints don't click. They are hydraulic, and go down silently. In addition there are redundant (secondary hydraulic) systems in place to insure that the restraints don't release while the ride is in motion. Not to mention that the RCS won't allow the train to be dispatched if it senses that any of the restraints are not fully locked. Actual restraint failure is extremely uncommon, almost to the point of impossible.

2. She is incorrect about where the accident happened. It wasn't on the drop, it was at the overbanked turn after the double-down maneuver following the first drop.

If I had to guess, and I don't mean to be offensive to anyone here, I would immediately assume that she was of a body type that makes it difficult to seat properly. Similar to the accident a few years back on another coaster, if a restraint is closed and is only resting on a person's stomach, there is a real risk of the person's stomach popping out over the restraint during times of negative g's. This leaves the restraint loose around their mid-section until it is either pushed down by the rider or by positive g's later in the ride.

My instinct tells me that this rider's body became loose in the restraints during the double-down maneuver, and was ejected seconds later as the train went into the overbanked turn.

Time will tell....
Very sad thing, though.
 
Feb 6, 2013
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"Approximately 297 million guests visit the 400 U.S. amusement parks annually and take 1.7 billion safe rides," the association says on its website.
Visitors of fixed-site amusement parks -- places where rides are permanently attached to the ground -- have a 1 in 24 million chance of being seriously injured, the association said.

THIS!!! They should have this in every column about this story. This story is already causing hysteria!
 
Jul 22, 2010
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b.mac said:
Sadly when something like this happens the numbers get casually ignored in order to hook readers and viewers. Numbers are more important than the actual facts these days and it's disappointing.

I would not say that they get lost because it is not the reporter's job to name statistics. It is a big deal because it is not an accepted risk the way they driving or the like is accepted. Just as with plane incidents, even with the few accidents it is still far far far safer than driving but the risks are not accepted the same as driving.
 
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^
So make sure your gut is on top of the bar?

EDIT: Not to make light of the situation, but maybe some of y'all can explain why there are so many rides with the lap t-bar nowadays? Is it cheaper or something? Maybe less cumbersome and the ride looks better? Seems like the OTS restraint like Nessie has might do a much better job and accommodate taller and/or bigger guests safely (like myself). That video almost makes me fearful for many of my buddies who I see riding coasters like AC.
 
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Shane

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In general I much prefer lap bar restraints. I find OTS very uncomfortable. I think the industry has moved in this direction for comfort and freedom of movement. You will see on a lot of PTC trains with the addition of a seat belt as well. I don't really know what a seat belt would actually do in this situation, but perhaps they are necessary for all lapbar style coasters.
 
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I can see that...freedom of movement. But at the same time, I don't want to be so FREE as to go flying like Superman on a big hop. I'd much rather feel tight and snug on these things.
 
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b.mac

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Apollo's Chariot uses clamshell restraints which are designed to fit snug onto people's thighs and pinch flat to their waist preventing movement. If their stomach restricts the movement of the restraint then they will be denied ability to ride.
 
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Shane said:
I don't really know what a seat belt would actually do in this situation, but perhaps they are necessary for all lapbar style coasters.

Easy. If it is on the sides of the restraint and tightened it could prevent full release. If it is under the lap bar then it would prevent the occupant from leaving the seat in the event of a lapbar malfunction.
 
Apr 29, 2011
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b.mac said:
Apollo's Chariot uses clamshell restraints which are designed to fit snug onto people's thighs and pinch flat to their waist preventing movement. If their stomach restricts the movement of the restraint then they will be denied ability to ride.

This. I remember seeing a man try to ride on opening weekend and was denied. While he fit easily in the seat the protrusion of his large belly prevented the restraint from clicking at all. And two ride-ops even tried to push down using their body weight. If all the restraints do not go down at least two clicks the ride won't dispatch.
 

netdvn

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I can see that...freedom of movement. But at the same time, I don't want to be so FREE as to go flying like Superman on a big hop. I'd much rather feel tight and snug on these things.

Most coasters can operate safely without shoulder harnesses. More parks are moving away from them since they really aren't completely necessary and at times are actually uncomfortable/restricting on riders. Many looping coasters were built in the 70s and 80s without shoulder harnesses. More parks are going back to that. In a lot of cases looping coasters with lapbars also have foot guards to keep you in place in crazy transitions.
 
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