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ControlsEE

I probably should be working...
Oct 2, 2018
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To be clear, I'm not freaking out that things aren't safe.... I understand redundancy, etc..... just a matter of separation being an even further safety feature and it seems like such a minor thing to deal with that occurs minimally.
There probably is a seperate feed, with its own redundant valves to supply the harnesses. Keep in mind that the feedback would be pressure transducers and if something were to go wrong, they would detect it and give a fault.
 
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Busch Gardens Flying Coaster
Jul 7, 2017
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Williamsburg VA
So what exactly do the lock bars and anticrush sequences comprise of? In regards to anticrushing, it obviously cuts off the air supply, but I assume it shuts a series of valves in each side and each bar - to prevent any backflow into the swing which could affect other bars? What about when the hosts press the lock button?

Everything related the the swing itself is air coming from a "restraint tank" in each of the two towers. This includes the rachet pawls themselves, anti crush pawls, the cooler and cleanout for the swing.

Once the lock button on the swing is pressed, this cuts off air to one side of each riders restraint. Each harness has main pawls which is the clicking you hear when the harness comes down to each riders body. There are also pawls that have one closed setting for the lap bar, as you hear when the lap bar comes over the rider's body. After the lap bar is down and the harness is down to the desired height, the operator will "lock" the harnesses. This cuts off the rest of the air to the swing, locking the anti crush pawls, which prevents the harness from going up or down during the ride cycle, until the switch is turned back to open.

Each harness also has individual valves to allow each seat to evacuate separately, which can either be done with power on or would need an accompanied hose if the power were off. The keyswitch on the control box where the lock button is on each swing allows operators to evacuate 8 riders on each side of the swing when power is on. I am not sure on the number of valves or redundancies there are preventing air from leaking into the harness, but I do know it is monitored. Of course the ride cycle air and restraint air are connected to the big tanks below the platform but everything is more than enough volume to keep up with cycling. In fact, those compressors for Finnegan's could run probably that whole half of the park in terms of air supply.
 
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May 7, 2022
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Once the lock button on the swing is pressed, this cuts off air to one side of each riders restraint. Each harness has main pawls which is the clicking you hear when the harness comes down to each riders body. There are also pawls that have one closed setting for the lap bar, as you hear when the lap bar comes over the rider's body. After the lap bar is down and the harness is down to the desired height, the operator will "lock" the harnesses. This cuts off the rest of the air to the swing, locking the anti crush pawls, which prevents the harness from going up or down during the ride cycle, until the switch is turned back to open.
So I'm assuming each pawl is sprung, with the spring working against the air pressure - so that if there's no pressure, the pawl disengages? Once the lock button is pressed, it dumps air into the locking pawls' piston, pushing it up against the ratchet, thus preventing the bar from coming up - the anticrush pawl and ratchet system faces the opposite direction, and when the selector switch for that is flicked over to "lock", it dumps the remaining air into the anticrush pawl's piston, preventing the bar from coming up?

Or is it the opposite - the spring tries to bring the piston towards the ratchet, and if air pressure is applied to the bars, they release? I guess this'd make more sense and would line up with why Screamin Swings anticrush in the case of a power outage.
 
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