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Jahrules

Possibly the 1-millionth Pantheon thread viewer.
Advisory Panel
Feb 3, 2019
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I love to see park employees treating guests with so much care.

On a semi-related note; I don't think that BGW has its official autism training certificate yet (many SEAS parks do). But it looks like they're well on their way.

This:

 
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ControlsEE

I probably should be working...
Oct 2, 2018
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When I worked there, this was actually encouraged by the park. During training, we were instructed that if a disabled guest does not have a member of their party to ride with and would like to be accompanied by someone, any free team member was allowed to ride with them, or a team member would be relived temporarily to ride with them.

Oddly enough, I think I know one of those guys...
 

horsesboy

DarKoaster stalker
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Jun 16, 2013
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Busch actually seems to do a very good job in this department both in guest interactions as well as employing some of these people. There is a gentleman working the exit gate station a lot of days that is a fine example of this as well as several other team members that I have noticed working in the park. Big thumbs up to the park for this.
 

ControlsEE

I probably should be working...
Oct 2, 2018
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Yep, I used to work with Diego. He was one of my team members.
 
Sep 14, 2014
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See THATS how you handle disabilities. Respectful cadence without condescendence.
Absolutely. My brother has a similar disability, and the amount of condescension he gets by others who are seeking a "look at me" moment angers me to no end. As his sister, the motives of people trying to make themselves out to be the "good guy" at my brother's expense stand out like sore thumbs to me. I can look at his Facebook page on any given day and see it clearly. That's why it's so refreshing to see this story, because these employees clearly did this without condescension or an underlying motive of obtaining "likes" or their 15 minutes of fame because of how "kind and good and tolerant" they were. I've known first-hand my entire life that Downs Syndrome absolutely does not make someone "less than" or deserving of pity, and it's wonderful to see a story where that attitude doesn't dominate. Thanks for sharing, @Jahrules
 
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