Crazy Stupid Rumors

Login or Register to Hide This Ad
Jul 16, 2019
156
85
28
Talked to an employee who said they heard scuttlebutt from a man at a gas station that Disney was interested in buying the park. Star Wars new hamlet confirmed????
:). There’s a Disney Company petroleum engineer job in Carson, California for that man at the gas station.
 
Feb 14, 2019
678
500
93
I've heard about that on Nessie, which I can see happening due to maybe a stuck trim brake on the top loop, but Alpie should have way too much force going through unless it was a bad wind day with an over-strong mcbr and low passenger weight for the barrel rolls.
 
Feb 14, 2019
678
500
93
If it had ever happened there would be pictures of it
Not necessarily, considering the ride opened in an era before phones with cameras or even compact cameras were common - and the stuck riders could have been staff before opening too?
 
Oct 7, 2011
1,047
3,384
113
Incredibly rare, you can count the number of times it has actually happened on your fingers. Has never happened at BGW, nor at almost any other park.

In the US, Demon at Great America (freak component failure + bad timing) and X-Coaster at Magic Springs (stupid ride design + animal frying both itself and the electrical system) do come to mind.
 
Sep 24, 2018
1,593
2,572
113
It's just incredibly rare even for a coaster to valley. It doesn't really matter how long ago it happened it would have been a news story even if it happened during testing. If there were people around when it happened there would have been at least a new article about it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LudwigII

ˁ˚ᴥ˚ˀ

Level 65 Rumor Bear
Aug 23, 2017
814
938
93
I think batman and robin could valley in the zero g roll before they removed them, that being the reason for removal.

Pretty much the only way to get a coaster stuck on a high point is if its prone to valleying to begin with(ttd) or some sorta brakes or lift lock up. So yeah...
 
Oct 7, 2011
1,047
3,384
113
Major failure of (e.g.) a wheel assembly can do it too. Extraordinarily unusual.

Agreed that stall-prone design is the slightly more likely (and safer) cause. Though “more likely” is a dodgy judgment when there are so few incidents in the first place.
 
Feb 14, 2019
678
500
93
It would have been at least reported news, which likely means at least one photo, if this were to have happened. Nobody gets stuck on a coaster upside down without it being on the local news at the very least. Even in the 90s and early 00s.
Maybe, but if in the incredibly rare occasion a set of circumstances caused a train to get stuck in an inversion, it's also quite possible that it's stuck in such a way that a maintenance guy could essentially push it then it could complete a circuit before a news crew could be there and obtain footage assuming said news crew could even be allowed to film.
 
Oct 7, 2011
1,047
3,384
113
So in this scenario a free-rolling train somehow would stall perfectly in an inversion, yet so delicately that one awkward push from a human could move it along? And a maintenance guy with presumably no next of kin to worry about would happen by and get right up underneath it, close enough to muster so powerful a shove from his precarious spot atop a bucket truck or a scissor lift or on a Home Depot A-frame that the multi-ton vehicle would move again? And the park’s maintenance department would actually direct, much less allow, the guy to do this?

Is that the scenario?
 
Sep 24, 2018
1,593
2,572
113
Maybe, but if in the incredibly rare occasion a set of circumstances caused a train to get stuck in an inversion, it's also quite possible that it's stuck in such a way that a maintenance guy could essentially push it then it could complete a circuit before a news crew could be there and obtain footage assuming said news crew could even be allowed to film.
Like @halfabee said this just wouldn't happen. Those trains are heavy. Last year gatekeeper at CP valleyed and they had to take the train apart to move it. In other instances they would attach a winch and try to pull it through. Never would the solution be to just climb on the track and push. That is so unsafe and more likely than not the guy will either fall and die or the coaster will roll back towards him. Also bare in mind that if a coaster couldn't make it through an inversion then it's pretty likely that it won't make it through the rest of the course as well.
 

ˁ˚ᴥ˚ˀ

Level 65 Rumor Bear
Aug 23, 2017
814
938
93
So in this scenario a free-rolling train somehow would stall perfectly in an inversion, yet so delicately that one awkward push from a human could move it along? And a maintenance guy with presumably no next of kin to worry about would happen by and get right up underneath it, close enough to muster so powerful a shove from his precarious spot atop a bucket truck or a scissor lift or on a Home Depot A-frame that the multi-ton vehicle would move again? And the park’s maintenance department would actually direct, much less allow, the guy to do this?

Is that the scenario?
...but upside down?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Joe
Oct 7, 2011
1,047
3,384
113
😊

LOL, I was thinking about both TTD and the Williams Grove Cyclone as I typed that. In those cases there is/was a safe place for a person to stand and push, designed for employees to walk on as needed from time to time...and without a coaster train dangling overhead...

Of course, one could argue that there was NO safe spot to be found anywhere on the Williams Grove Cyclone’s structure, including inside the train. But that’s a different story...
 
Feb 14, 2019
678
500
93
I was still thinking specifically on the top loop of Nessie, since there appears to be a way for a maintenance employee to safely get on top and nudge the train along to complete the circuit.

List of assumptions (too many coincidences and conjecture for this combination to be likely at all):
- They could get to the mid-loop platform for inspections without walking on the catwalk that runs down the spine, or can reach with a pole from the ground.
- The maintenance employee(s) aren't nudging with bare hands but instead can push with a pole or some other tool.
- The train stalled because of a trim brake/weight issue and not because of any mechanical failures of the train/wheel assemblies.
- Nessie's design is such that there's enough momentum of a train from a dead stop on the top of the upper loop to carry on to the MCBR and thus is able to complete the circuit.
- Most other modern rides would be more likely to valley and not get stuck in an inversion as they're going too have too much momentum to stall in the loop, even coming from a dead stop, because there aren't any trim brakes between the high point and the inversion that'd limit the momentum.

And since that's not overkill enough for an absurd scenario, the most important part of there not being any surviving images or video from the era before smartphones would be that the park would have had to grant permission for any news crews to obtain footage or images, which it most likely would not have done, and the WAVY 10 helicopter likely had to obtain access to restricted airspace to film assuming it could even make it to JCC anyways.

Thanks for reading my novel...
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: BenWilkerson
Login or Register to Hide This Ad