Coronavirus Crisis

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Feb 3, 2019
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I have a letter as well, but I mark utilities on behalf of Utility Companies.
This makes perfect sense though... If they have to do emergency utility work to reroute lines or add capacity; I could see you being absolutely critical to that.
 
Jul 16, 2019
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The letters specifically reference federal code and orders signed by the president. Please tell me this is some kind of movie or that I over slept and it's April 1st.
If it makes you feel better, the announcement about remote-work at our organization said we would be reporting back to work April 1.
 
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Apr 7, 2013
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Anyone know if the bill "income caps" are on total income, adjusted gross income, or taxable income?
 
Aug 1, 2010
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Seven Pines, Virginia
So in the this shit just got real category. We were handed letters at work today announcing that we have been officially declared an essential operation per the federal emergency declaration and given info on what we need to have and do to travel to work in the event of further restriction. The letters specifically reference federal code and orders signed by the president. Please tell me this is some kind of movie or that I over slept and it's April 1st.
Travel Papers. I got my letter yesterday. It's based upon the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency's (CISA) March 19, 2020 memo. Mine covers water supply, sanitary sewer systems, roads and bridges. The list is quite extensive and covers the engineering, construction, waste disposal, public works operations, roadways, all utilities and support and office staff for those previously listed operations including auto and fleet maintenance.
 

horsesboy

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Jun 16, 2013
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Do you know how old the child was?
On the radio they read the full statement issued by LA county health on it. Which very clearly stated that they are looking at it as a death of a person with the virus but not necessarily a death that was caused by it. I found that part very interesting.
 
Feb 3, 2019
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So, I found this today which I thought was extremely interesting.

Basically, Oxford (which I think everyone knows is a credible institution) is doing research which suggests that the Coronavirus has been around for a lot longer than widely believed.

In short, many people got sick and only had mild symptoms. Initial evidence is that some people were tested for flu and came back negative and the Drs at the time didn't really know what it was.

More testing underway to see if people already have antibodies present for Coronavirus which would confirm the study.

Very interesting. Many people I know got sick this winter (my wife included) with what they thought was a bad cold that held on for a lot longer than normal. Maybe it was actually Coronavirus.

 
Feb 14, 2019
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If that's the case, then would it stand to reason that many people already have had it and are not as susceptible to getting it now?

Also, does it make sense that scientists can fast-track healing therapies if not a cure if they find how the human body has been able to fight it off?
 
Feb 3, 2019
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If that's the case, then would it stand to reason that many people already have had it and are not as susceptible to getting it now?

Also, does it make sense that scientists can fast-track healing therapies if not a cure if they find how the human body has been able to fight it off?
Yep, at least on the first point. It would mean we are closer to herd immunity.

On the second, maybe. I don't know a lot about how therapies like that work; I surmise, though, that it requires a lot of research and that takes time. So I don't think there is a quick answer.

It's still really early in the research.

They may even find that the theorized early cases were an original strain and it since mutated worse symptoms.
 
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Feb 14, 2019
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Maybe I missed something, but coronavirus isn't a new thing, only the current strain: Covid-19. By mutation (to be honest I'm not sure by what means that occurs outside of mixing DNA/RNA with an infected host), wouldn't it be considered a different strain?
 
Feb 3, 2019
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Maybe I missed something, but coronavirus isn't a new thing, only the current strain: Covid-19. By mutation (to be honest I'm not sure by what means that occurs outside of mixing DNA/RNA with an infected host), wouldn't it be considered a different strain?
Well not necessarily.

Viruses have a sort of family/genus/species just like scientists name animals and plants.

So, a species can mutate new symptoms and still be the same species. I.e. the same antibodies fight it.

Think of an example in flu type A and type B. Even within type A and B; each year, the flu virus mutates in different ways. Last year's type A is not this year's type A. That's why it's a new vaccine each year. Scientists use data modelling to predict what mutations will be the most successful and build the vaccine to prevent that. But, even if you get a different strain, the same antibodies produced by your body from the vaccine will help you fight that flu.

So, coming back to COVID-19; even if it is a mutation, the antibodies produced in the infected will help their bodies fight future strains as long as it is the same species.

This does not work for different species within the same family. Having previously gotten SARS (SARS-COV-1) for instance, does not give you Antibodies for COVID-19 (SARS-COV-2) even though they're in the same family.
 
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Feb 14, 2019
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Back to there having been other coronaviruses over time - I think my confusion is based on the naming scheme since up until a quick search ago I was under the impression that 19 denoted a strain version/mutation, not what year it was discovered since it's logical to me that more than one coronavirus could be discovered in the same year (late winter/early spring and late fall/winter).

Thanks for the info, @Jahrules!
 
Feb 3, 2019
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Back to there having been other coronaviruses over time - I think my confusion is based on the naming scheme since up until a quick search ago I was under the impression that 19 denoted a strain version/mutation, not what year it was discovered since it's logical to me that more than one coronavirus could be discovered in the same year (late winter/early spring and late fall/winter).

Thanks for the info, @Jahrules!
Yeah I think this has confused a lot of people.

Technically the virus is SARS-COV-2. The second strain of SARS.

Covid-19 is the condition the virus causes in humans.
 
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