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Aug 31, 2013
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Well, this idea came to me one late night.

The wrist band thing for the Food and wine festival, why not have one for the entire season!
This one however, sees when you had a drink, what you had to drink, and the level of alcohol in it. In order to get a drink, you must have this scanned, before you are able to have another. If you have had too much, that level determined by the park, you can not be served anymore until the proper amount of time has passed for that level of alcohol has passed through your system. This would reduce drunken alterations inside the park, and most importantly, have most people drinking earlier in the day, so they can work off the alcohol, at least enough to have more drinks later on.


Also,during HoS, in order to go into mazes, your blood-alcohol, level has to be at a certain level, or lower.


This would not only increase the safety of the workers, but of the guests too.
 

Peter R.

Loch Ness Monster Lives...45 Years! 1978-2023
Aug 14, 2010
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Not to rain on your parade, but alcohol affects different people in different manners, depending on tolerance, weight etc. It would be difficult to impossible to set one standard.
 
Oct 3, 2013
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I don't remember ever seeing anyone stumbling around or acting drunk at the park.

I'll polish off 6-8 beers in one evening of HOS alone. I enjoy watching the shows and I enjoy drinking my beer. I don't act drunk, nor do I cause any problems. I'm an adult, and I can manage my alcohol content without someone branding me with a wristband. I also have my wife who does the driving.

Like Peter said, alcohol affects everyone differently. One person may drink 3 beers and not be the least bit phased, while someone else may be 1/2 tilted.

Being someone who purchases quite a bit of beer at the park, I can attest the employees do a very good job of not over serving, especially if you're trying to order two drinks at the same time. They ask you where the other person is, and if their not with you, you don't get the second drink.

I remember one instance this past year where management refused someone any more drinks, and actually notified all the other places that sell beer to be on the lookout for him. There's always a few bad apples in the bunch, but that doesn't mean the rest of us should have to wear a wrist band.

Now, if you want to start pushing a great idea, push for the $15 all you can eat dining pass that Tampa has. :shocked: That's a winner winner chicken dinner deal!
 
Dec 23, 2011
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Malsdad said:
I don't remember ever seeing anyone stumbling around or acting drunk at the park.

Its not even about people stumbling around or acting drunk. Its about people who are drunk that can hide it. It does happen a lot more than it should. These drunk people are probably one of the main causes team members get attacked during Howl-o-Scream.

Now as for the original concept, I think it is a good idea, but it doesn't answer many issues, like those who feel alcohol differently. You could always do breathalyzer tests and see that way, but then you're just starting to get ridiculous.

As unfortunate as it is that you can't stop all those who do get drunk and belligerent, the current system of just looking at a person and guessing if they are good works for now.
 
Jul 16, 2011
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On the flip side, I would prefer a wrist band like the F&W Festival that was a different color if you are over 21, so the servers don't have to ID you each time. :)
 
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Oct 3, 2013
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Chesterfield
I rarely get carded, but I welcome it :p Plus most of the beer servers know me by now :blush:

I think they could utilize the bio-metric finger scanning they already have in place. If they would update their POS devices throughout the park, you could use your index finger for everything. You could link a credit card to your account for purchases, and then all you would have to do is use your index finger for purchases around the park. It would also tell them if you're 21 or not, alleviating standing in a line to show ID and get a bracelet.

Not to get too off track, but I still can't determine why they just don't go with the finger scan alone at the entrance, instead of having to scan your pass too.
Of all things that need to be renovated, it's the entire front gate system.
 
Sep 8, 2010
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Party Rocker said:
Malsdad said:
I don't remember ever seeing anyone stumbling around or acting drunk at the park.

Its not even about people stumbling around or acting drunk. Its about people who are drunk that can hide it. It does happen a lot more than it should. These drunk people are probably one of the main causes team members get attacked during Howl-o-Scream.

I'd argue that just as many people who haven't been drinking "attack" HOS team members. Using alcohol as the reason everything bad happens is a shitty excuse.

Also, as stated this idea just isn't even mildly feasible.
 
Sep 28, 2009
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One of my first jobs was working at a chain restaurant's cocktail bar area. I can definitely say that "intoxication" wristbands are not a good idea. You can only deny a person a drink if they "appear" to be intoxicated. If someone wants to have three drinks in an hour- there is nothing to stop them until they look inebriated.

How to tell if someone is completely wasted is NOT easy- however: Size, gender, the rate of consumption, the strength of each drink, the amount of food and the additional use of drugs all are to be considered when determining how quickly alcohol may be affecting someone.

Being loud, talkative, rude, increased use of foul language, becoming more flirty.. however, as a server- the sign that they are dropping things, drifting off mid sentence, and fumbling things, dropping things, etc.. should be an indication that it is time to politely cut them off.. when you do... you have to keep in mind that:

You also need to be aware that people may have a medical condition or mental disability that causes them to sound inebriated or have an unsteady gait. You also cannot deny a pregnant woman a drink- kid you not. People may be on medication that makes them less tolerant to alcohol- something you cannot tell with a wristband.

If a person meets the "you feel that they need to be cut off" vibe... then it becomes touch and go.

1. You have to be nice. If they are not getting the hint- be firm- but still polite.
2. Try to find a more "sober" friend to help in the situation and make sure you are giving them plenty of water.
3. Keep them talking in order to allow them more time. Make chit chat conversation with them.
4. Really, a person who serves drinks really needs to be a people person and can "read" people well. Every person handles rejection differently. One person may be "OK" and walk off- the next may want to get angry. You have to be able to handle anything with a calm and understanding demeanor. (Yet firm and consistent).
5. If all else fails- call security. I have only had to do this once- on Super Bowl day.

People who enjoy getting buzzed have the absolute right to. The main thing is that there is someone who is kind enough to look out for them. People may have a "higher tolerance" for alcohol (meaning not showing the signs as quickly), but regardless- they are still intoxicated.

The best route of Busch Gardens is to have trained servers and security to handle the situation- that way everyone can enjoy their trip without Big Brother watching.
 
Dec 23, 2011
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Malsdad said:
Not to get too off track, but I still can't determine why they just don't go with the finger scan alone at the entrance, instead of having to scan your pass too.
Of all things that need to be renovated, it's the entire front gate system.

The finger scanners only compare your last print to your first one. You last print is linked to your card, thus you must scan the card to find the previous print. If you were to just use your print, it would have to compare your fingerprint to every other fingerprint last used including the ones just being scanned as you scanned your creating longer delays. The card acts as an easy way to track your fingerprint down amongst the huge collection.
 
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