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Zachary

Administrator
Sep 23, 2009
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Now that staff training has started, let's talk about these "new trains."

First off, I've seen nothing to suggest that the trains in question are actually completely new. From the evidence I've seen, it appears to me that the chassis are almost certainly recycled from the previous set and it is just everything above them that is being replaced. Again, I'm not sure of this, but that is what the circumstantial evidence is currently suggesting.

Secondly, these new fiberglass bodies seem to be modeled after later generation Arrow trains than Loch Ness Monster initially ran. That said, they don't seem like perfect replicas of any specific train but, instead, an amalgamation of elements from a number of different designs—all brought together to create some sort of new, Frankenstein-equse imitation Arrow train design.

That sounds negative, but I really don't intend for it to be read as such. In fact, it seems pretty smart to comb through the various Arrow looper train iterations and build a "greatest hits" train of sorts—featuring beneficial elements from the various different models.

So, with all that said, what is different about these new Loch Ness Monster train bodies?

  • The new car bodies are very similar to those currently found on Anaconda at Kings Dominion. Gone are the flared fenders around the wheel wells (picture for reference). Instead we have a smooth, flat body around the wheel wells (example). The solid train wall at shoulder height has also been dramatically reduced in size compared to LNM's original design (example of the new size).
     
  • That's not to say they are identical though. I'm not yet sure whether or not LNM's new train bodies have the same pair of rounded horizontal "pinstripes" down their length as can be found on many similar Arrow trains. Additionally, the metal bars around the shoulder area of the new bodies are substantially different than anything I've seen on trains of this style (they are still chrome too!).
     
  • Perhaps the most notable changes with this new design (vs both LNM's original bodies and typical Arrow bodies) are the trains' headrests. They are much taller than normal Arrow looper trains. A good example of these "skyscraper" headrests can be found on Tennessee Tornado at Dollywood (picture).
     
  • I know a lot of people were really hoping for some sort of restraint change, but, for better or for worse, the new bodies seem to be fitted with the same exact restraints as we've long been accustomed to.
     
  • Unfortunately there is one other negative I have to mention here... May the orange stripe rest in peace. :(
Anyway, all that said, I'm really looking forward to talking to someone from Design & Engineering about these changes because, to be honest, overall, this seems like a somewhat bizarre linear alteration. With such a substantial investment, I would have expected to see some more substantive modifications to improve guest experience.

That said, I don't want to downplay the importance of these changes. Every investment into a ride this age is a huge deal and the park should be commended for it.
 

Luke

Pusheen Gardens
Silver Donor
Jul 20, 2011
1,678
6,475
113
Zachary said:
Now that staff training has started, let's talk about these "new trains."

First off, I've seen nothing to suggest that the trains in question are actually completely new. From the evidence I've seen, it appears to me that the chassis are almost certainly recycled from the previous set and it is just everything above them that is being replaced. Again, I'm not sure of this, but that is what the circumstantial evidence is currently suggesting.

Secondly, these new fiberglass bodies seem to be modeled after later generation Arrow trains than Loch Ness Monster initially ran. That said, they don't seem like perfect replicas of any specific train but, instead, an amalgamation of elements from a number of different designs—all brought together to create some sort of new, Frankenstein-equse imitation Arrow train design.

That sounds negative, but I really don't intend for it to be read as such. In fact, it seems pretty smart to comb through the various Arrow looper train iterations and build a "greatest hits" train of sorts—featuring beneficial elements from the various different models.

So, with all that said, what is different about these new Loch Ness Monster train bodies?

  • The new car bodies are very similar to those currently found on Anaconda at Kings Dominion. Gone are the flared fenders around the wheel wells (picture for reference). Instead we have a smooth, flat body around the wheel wells (example). The solid train wall at shoulder height has also been dramatically reduced in size compared to LNM's original design (example of the new size).
     
  • That's not to say they are identical though. I'm not yet sure whether or not LNM's new train bodies have the same pair of rounded horizontal "pinstripes" down their length as can be found on many similar Arrow trains. Additionally, the metal bars around the shoulder area of the new bodies are substantially different than anything I've seen on trains of this style (they are still chrome too!).
     
  • Perhaps the most notable changes with this new design (vs both LNM's original bodies and typical Arrow bodies) are the trains' headrests. They are much taller than normal Arrow looper trains. A good example of these "skyscraper" headrests can be found on Tennessee Tornado at Dollywood (picture).
     
  • I know a lot of people were really hoping for some sort of restraint change, but, for better or for worse, the new bodies seem to be fitted with the same exact restraints as we've long been accustomed to.
     
  • Unfortunately there is one other negative I have to mention here... May the orange stripe rest in peace. :(
Anyway, all that said, I'm really looking forward to talking to someone from Design & Engineering about these changes because, to be honest, overall, this seems like a somewhat bizarre linear alteration. With such a substantial investment, I would have expected to see some more substantive modifications to improve guest experience.

That said, I don't want to downplay the importance of these changes. Every investment into a ride this age is a huge deal and the park should be commended for it.
Thank you for the update. Have they done anything in the tunnel? Lights? smoke? Like they use to have.
 
Aug 3, 2017
325
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93
Lord Robert said:
Any word about the entire coaster getting a fresh coat of paint or new chain lift? Or anything for that matter?
Those white tarps were because the paint had to be scraped, and if any paint chips fell into the Rhine, there would be some nasty legal matters. So yes, parts of the ride got repainted. For what we know, the entire ride could’ve been repainted during the off season.
 

Lord Robert

"Not pet. Wingman."
Apr 18, 2014
1,091
1,726
113
I hope so. I wonder if anything else other than the coaster itself is getting some new touches for it's 40th (mostly with the queue and station).
 
Likes: jornor

RollyCoaster

Silver Donor
Jul 31, 2016
364
994
93
I still do not understand why they leave it shut all the time. It's almost the same distance to get to the station (Assuming you don't duck under the switchbacks). It's really cool to walk through, and the effects of the extended queue still work great. Having it mandatory to walk through wouldn't take anything away from the guest, and if anything, having to walk through it just adds to the experience.

Even if you politely ask the employee at the ride entrance, they almost always tell me that i'm not allowed to go that way. What is the park hiding? Nessie has the 2nd most theming of all the coasters at the park and hardly anybody knows it! Let the world know!
 

Zimmy

Nessie thinks it is not polite to ask her age!
Sep 28, 2013
4,120
6,062
113
I have to say, when it used to be mandatory it became a bit of a PIA, and people used to cut across it and do horrible things.  Kind of like they used to do to the bushes at Bolt.  I wouldn't mind them opening it from time to time when the park is busy and Nessie itself is not as its own attraction, (with its own entrance and exist) and not as part of the Nessie line.
 
Oct 7, 2011
491
1,705
93
Zachary said:
The new car bodies are very similar to those currently found on Anaconda at Kings Dominion. Gone are the flared fenders around the wheel wells (picture for reference). Instead we have a smooth, flat body around the wheel wells (example).
Do the new trains also feature larger diameter wheels than the original Nessie trains?

They aren't required obviously, but I do wonder whether they might offer a slightly smoother ride...
 

Zimmy

Nessie thinks it is not polite to ask her age!
Sep 28, 2013
4,120
6,062
113
MadridBot said:
I wonder if the ride entrance sign will change. That new logo looks phenomenal. Lembke has already been doing a great job and the season hasn’t even started.
Do you have any actual evidence that Lembke had ANYTHING to do with this decision? If so can you please share this little detail? Frankly I find it HIGHLY unlikely that he has done ANYTHING beyond unpack his office and try to become fully aware of his surroundings. For gods sakes the man has only been there a hot second. Besides a marketing campaign like this takes a rather long time and certainly more than one person to pull together. Finally why would a park president bother himself with those low level details, that is why he has a marketing department. Ordinarily he might give them a direction if he were so inclined and then maybe pass off or not on the final samples. But get that deep into the weeds? Doubtful.

I grow extremely tired of folks posting explicit statements that infer that they "know," or have some kind of inside track without ANY kind of referential data. That is not how good journalism works, and it certainly is not how a person makes him or herself sound like a qualified professional or expert. It just makes you sound like an uniformed ass.
 
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